2.6 Using Dashes to Mark Rhythm

When writing out rhythms, I often find it helpful to use a “dash” to show how long to hold out a particular note. For instance, here’s the rhythm of “Jingle Bells”:

| 1  +  2  +  3  +  4  +  |  1  +  2  +  3  +  4  +  |
| /  –  /  –  /  –  –  –  |  /  –  /  –  /  –  –  –  |
  Jin-  gle   bells          Jin-  gle   bells
| 1  +  2  +  3  +  4  +  |  1  +  2  +  3  +  4  +  |
| /  –  /  –  /  –  –  /  |  /  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  |
  Jin-  gle   all      the   way
| 1  +  2  +  3  +  4  +  |  1  +  2  +  3  +  4  +  |
| /  –  /  –  /  –  –  /  |  /  –  /  –  /  –  /  /  |
  Oh    what  fun      it    is    to    ride  on a

If I’m just clapping that rhythm, I can’t “hold out” the notes as long as the dashes tell me; there’s no such thing as a “long clap” as opposed to a “short clap.” But if I’m singing, or playing the guitar, the dashes help me to remember when to “let a note ring” and when to cut it short.

Using dashes like this can also help you see where notes are getting stretched and compressed. Take a look at the “all” in measure 3. You expect “all” to end with the third beat, and “the” to begin on the fourth beat. But instead, you stretch “all” into the fourth beat, then delay and compress “the.” “All” expands, and “the” contracts. This makes the rhythm interesting.

We then do the same thing in the fifth measure, stretching the “fun” and compressing/delaying the “it.”

But now, I want you to tell me which famous hymn the following rhythm belongs to. It is in 3/4 time, which means it has three beats per measure. This is unusual for hymns. However, the meter is “simple” because each of its beats is divided into halves. This is the whole first verse, and this hymn has no chorus.

3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + |
/ – | / – – – / / | / – – – / – | / – – – / – | / – – – / – |
    | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + |
    | / – – – / / | / – – – / – | / – – – – – | – – – – / – |
    | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + |
    | / – – / / / | / – – – / – | / – – / / / | / – – – / – |
    | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + | 1 + 2 + 3 + |
    | / – – – / / | / – – – / – | / – – – – – | – – – – – – |

This hymn starts “on the pickup,” rather than on the first beat. The rhythm is divided into four groups of four measures, and the first measure of each group has an extra “repetition” on the upbeat after 3. This “adding an extra repetition” thing is then expanded in the third line, such that we have four repetitions covering the transition from measure 1 to measure 2. And then the same thing happens again in the transition from measure 3 to measure 4. Clearly, the songwriter has gone wild.

Did you figure out which hymn it is? It’s the most famous hymn of all time. No? Okay, the lyrics were written by John Newton, and Wikipedia tells me the tune we sing those lyrics to is called “New Britain.” But that’s not the name of the hymn.

Still nothing? You tried googling it? (“Google” is a funny word.) Well, I’m not going to tell you. So there.

PREVIOUS | NEXT

________

Featured image by Tomasz Proszek

Leave a Reply