Ep. 4 Notes (“Whoomp! There It Is,” by Tag Team / “Whoot, There It Is,” by 95 South)

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The Songs

This episode deals with two songs:

“Whoomp! (There It Is),” by Tag Team

And here are the lyrics.

“Whoot, There It Is,” by 95 South

And here are the lyrics (to a remix; so they’re not exactly the same as in the video).

A ton of other songs also show up in this episode:

“I Will Always Love You,” by Whitney Houston

The Princess Bride

“Who’s Real,” by Jadakiss, ft. Swizz Beats & OJ Da Juiceman

“The Real Slim Shady,” by Eminem

“Copy, Paste,” by Diggy Simmons

“Boom Boom Pow,” by The Black Eyed Peas

“Say My Name,” by Destiny’s Child

“Name,” by Goo Goo Dolls

“Hold You Down,” by DJ Khaled, ft. Chris Brown, August Alsina, Future, and Jeremih

“My Name Is,” by Eminem

“Baby,” by Justin Bieber, ft. Ludacris

“All I Do Is Win,” by DJ Khaled, Rock Ross, T-Pain, and Snoop Dogg

“Breakfast,” by Kreayshawn, ft. 2 Chainz

“Talk Dirty,” by Jason Derulo, ft. 2 Chainz

References

Websites

Information I drew on for the podcast can be found at:

The Wikipedia article for “Whoomp! (There It Is).”

The Wikipedia article for “Whoot, There It Is.”

The Weekly Top 40’s list of Billboard’s Top 40 Hot 100 Songs for 1993.

The Wikipedia list of Billboard’s Year End Hot 100 songs for 1993.

Billboard’s Hot R&B/Hip-Hop #1 Songs List.

The Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs Chart for July 17th, 1993.

The Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs Chart for July 31st, 1993.

The Song Facts article on “Whoomp! (There It Is).”

Philosophical Sources

My discussion of Plato’s theory of forms derives from his book, the Republic.

For another philosopher’s discussion of Plato’s theory of forms, see Samuel Rickless’s article on Plato’s Parmenides at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

On the Third Man Problem, see the Wikipedia article thereon.

For Aristotle’s theory of forms, matter, and actuality, see S. Marc Cohen’s “Aristotle’s Metaphysics,” at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

On Ockham, see Claude Panaccio’s article at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

On nominalism, see Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereya’s article at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

On Hussel’s theory of names, as interpreted by me, see this draft of my article published by The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy.

On the more influential theories of names, see Sam Cumming’s article at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Comments, Corrections, and Feedback

In addition to rating the podcast and/or leaving a review on iTunes, please feel free to leave comments, corrections, and suggestions below!

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Featured image by Lisa Johnson. Provided under a CC0 Public Domain license.

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2 thoughts on “Ep. 4 Notes (“Whoomp! There It Is,” by Tag Team / “Whoot, There It Is,” by 95 South)

  • I like your philosophy of names. I think it has to include another element, which is that we often give our own names to things (and people) that already have names – in other words, not only is the name our experience of that object, but we name our experience of that object. It may be the same name it already had, it might be a diminutive or completely alternative name, but until we name that object ourselves, our experience of the object is impersonal and limited. So, in this permutation, what we name is not the object itself, I suppose, but our experience of the object, which leaves others (including the object itself) to name it’s own experience of the object.

    As Szasz said: “In the animal kingdom, the rule is, eat or be eaten; in the human kingdom, define or be defined.”

  • Oooo, nice! I hadn’t even considered that. We find some names just lying around, as it were, but come up with others ourselves. They have to be both appropriate to the thing/person named, and appropriate to us as the namers. I haven’t thought much about the coming-up-with-names process, though I go through it whenever I have to name a new car. (All my cars have had names, and till I got out of college, they tended to die frequently, so I had to keep coming up with new names.) Thanks for the intellectual stimulation!

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